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Curriculum & Courses

Accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), students in the middle and high school programs fill their schedules with a combination of core and elective courses.

Middle School

Middle school courses in grades 6-8 are similar to those taught in schools across the Bay Area. Our middle school curriculum is aimed at building academic self-confidence and fostering independence in preparation for high school. Students take core courses in language arts, social studies, science, and math. They can also choose to take world language electives like French and Spanish.

Course Offerings

MIDDLE SCHOOL HISTORY

Grade 6 - World History
In 6th grade, students build their knowledge of world history, from the Neolithic Revolution through the Middle Ages. Students explore the lives, struggles, and accomplishments of people living in these time periods. Additionally, students study how social, economic, and political structures developed, as well as the establishment and spread of ideas that helped transform the world.
Grade 7 - World History and Geography: Medieval and Early Modern Times
In 7th grade, students continue to build upon their knowledge of world history by picking up where they left off at the end of the 6th grade social studies core course. Students focus on Medieval and Early Modern times through the Renaissance and Enlightenment.
Grade 8 - U.S. History
In 8th grade, students build their knowledge of U.S. history, from the peopling of North America through the Reconstruction Era. By constantly honing their ability to analyze history, students build the depth of knowledge and higher-order thinking skills required to demonstrate their mastery when put to the test.
Civics
In Civics, students build their understanding of the political and governmental systems of the United States and the roles played by citizens. Throughout the course, students analyze civic life, political practices, and government structures.
Contemporary World
The Contemporary World class is designed to build middle school students' knowledge of contemporary world geography, cultures, civics, and economics. Throughout the course, students analyze the physical, social, and political forces that shape our world.

MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE

Integrated Science 6
Built to Next Generation Science Standards for middle school, Grade 6 Integrated Science helps students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts such as the flow of energy and matter through both living and nonliving systems, including Earth's systems; Earth's weather and climate; the interaction between humans and the environment; the relationship between structure and function; and growth, development, and reproduction in organisms.
Integrated Science 7
Grade 7 Integrated Science is built to Next Generation Science Standards for middle school learners. Throughout the course, students explore concepts such as the structures and properties of matter; chemical reactions; the flow of energy through systems, including Earth's living and nonliving systems; and the history of Earth.
Integrated Science 8
Grade 8 Integrated Science is built to Next Generation Science Standards for middle school learners. Throughout the course, students explore concepts such as waves and electromagnetic radiation; energy and forces on Earth and in space; genetics and natural selection; engineering design; and the impact of humans on Earth's resources.
Grade 6: Earth Science
In Earth Science, students explore concepts that include Earth's systems, engineering design, the nature of the universe, and the interaction between humans and the environment.
Grade 7: Life Science
In Life Science, students explore concepts that include the relationship between structure and function, the flow of energy and matter through living systems, heredity, and the diversity of life.
Grade 8: Physical Science
In Physical Science, students explore concepts that include the interactions of matter; motion and stability; waves and their technological applications; and energy.

MIDDLE SCHOOL ENGLISH

English 6-8
In English 6-8, students continue to build upon their communication and reading comprehension skills. They strengthen their critical analysis skills as they study how nonfiction and literature can be used to share ideas. Writing lessons combine free-response exercises with drafting strategies and exemplars to help students communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles. Students develop skills specific to public discourse by, in part, evaluating clips and readings from speeches and discussions. In language lessons, students build foundational grammar skills they need to articulate their ideas and expand their lexicon.
Personal Communication
In Personal Communication, 8th grade students learn how to become effective at verbal and nonverbal expression. Topics include intrapersonal and interpersonal interaction, informal communication and interviewing, and preparing and delivering informal, informational, and persuasive addresses. Students also engage in recognizing bias, elements of ethical communication, conflict resolution, evaluating media messages, group dynamics, and participate in peer review.
Media Literacy
In Media Literacy, 8th grade students learn how to build the critical thinking, writing, and reading skills required in a media-rich and increasingly technocentric world. They develop their non-traditional media reading skills, including how to approach, analyze, and respond to advertisements, blogs, websites, social media, news media, and wikis. Students also engage in a variety of writing activities in non-traditional media genres, such as blogging and podcast scripting. Students consider their own positions as consumers of media and explore ways to use non-traditional media to become more active and thoughtful citizens. Students learn how to ask critical questions about the intended audience and underlying purpose of media messages, and study factors which can contribute to bias and affect credibility.

MIDDLE SCHOOL MATHEMATICS

Math 6
In Math 6, students develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply mathematical practices. Course topics include ratios and rates, fraction and decimal operations, and signed numbers. Students build their algebra skills by plotting points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane and solving equations and inequalities. Geometry topics include area, surface area, and volume, and statistical work features measures of center and variability, box plots, dot plots, and histograms.
Math 7
In Math 7, students gain a deep understanding of proportions and their use in solving problems. Students extend their fluency with operations on rational numbers and translate among different forms of rational numbers. Algebra topics include simplifying and rewriting algebraic expressions and solving more complex equations and inequalities. Students also sketch geometric figures and explore scale drawings, investigate circle properties and angle relationships, and deepen their understanding of area, volume, and surface area. They see how statistics uses sample data to make predictions about populations and compare data from different data sets. Students gain a fundamental understanding of probability and explore different ways to find or estimate probabilities.
Math 8
In Math 8, students focus on understanding functions — what they are, how to represent them in different ways, and how to write them to model mathematical and real-world situations. In particular, students investigate linear functions by learning about slope and slope-intercept form. Students' understanding of linear functions is extended to statistics, where they make scatter plots and use linear functions to model data. They solve linear equations and equations involving roots, and explore systems of linear equations. Additional topics include exponents, powers of ten, scientific notation, and irrational numbers. Students learn about transformations, and extend that understanding to an investigation of congruence and similarity. Other geometric concepts explored include the Pythagorean theorem, angle relationships, and volumes of cylinders, cones, and spheres.
Pre-Algebra
In Pre-Algebra, the focus is on foundational concepts that prepare students for success in Algebra I. Through a "Discovery-Confirmation-Practice"-based exploration of concepts, students are challenged to work toward a mastery of computational skills, to deepen their understanding of key ideas and solution strategies, and to extend their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications. Course topics include integers; the language of algebra; solving equations with addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division; fractions and decimals; measurement; exponents; solving equations with roots and powers; multi-step equations; and linear equations.

MIDDLE SCHOOL LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH (LOTE)

French 1A
French 1A is the first in a two-part series designed to initially expose middle school students to French and kickstart their language study. Students learn to use basic grammar, such as verb conjugations and definite articles, as well as vocabulary used in different contexts, like at restaurants, in order to express themselves. They develop their knowledge of the French language through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Additionally, students gain an understanding and appreciation of the geography, history, and culture of various French-speaking regions.
French 1B
French 1B is the second in a two-part series designed for middle school students to gain a basic command of the French language prior to high school. Students first review and practice what they learned in French 1A before delving into new material. They study a variety of new grammar concepts, such as possessive adjectives, adjective agreement, more nasal sounds, indefinite articles, glides, more vowel sounds, and the perfect tense. New vocabulary centers around various real-life situations, including family and identifying people; describing and characterizing people; asking for, giving, and refusing permission; chores; and items at the market, to name a few.
Spanish 1A
Spanish 1A is the first in a two-part series designed to initially expose middle school students to Spanish and kickstart their language study. Students learn how to use the Spanish alphabet, subject pronouns, the infinitive and conjugated forms of verbs, ir/regular verbs, in/definite articles, noun-adjective agreement, verb tenses, possessive adjectives, comparatives, stem-changing verbs, and direct object pronouns. Additionally, students are introduced to vocabulary like greetings, introductions, numbers, dates, days of the week, classroom objects, food, time, descriptions, expressions, family, clothing, shopping, places, and events.
Spanish 1B
Spanish 1B is the second in a two-part series designed for middle school students to gain a basic command of the Spanish language prior to high school. Students first review and practice what they learned in Spanish 1A before delving into new material. They study a variety of new grammar concepts, such as ordinal numbers, more irregular verbs, and the preterite tense, as they learn about Spanish-speaking cultures in Latin America. New vocabulary centers around household items, chores, planning a party, sports, a review of numbers, parts of the body, talking about when events occur, sending emails, making phone calls, and places of interest.

High School

We provide students with UC/CSU-approved (A-G) college preparatory courses and more than 40 NCAA-approved classes in all subjects. High schoolers heading to college choose from a robust course list to prepare for post-secondary education rigors and meet eligibility requirements. Students planning to go to trade schools or into the workforce engage in academic preparation that exceeds state standards.

Course Offerings*

HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES

U.S. History*
United States History and Geography begins with the establishment of European colonies in North America and then traces the nation's history from post-Civil War to the present. Students examine the beliefs and philosophies that informed the American Revolution and the subsequent formation of the government and political system, then evaluate the attempts to bind the nation together during Reconstruction while simultaneously exploring the growth of an industrial economy. Moving into the 20th and 21st centuries, students probe the economic and diplomatic interactions between the United States and other world players while investigating how the world wars, the Cold War, and the "information revolution" affected the lives of ordinary Americans.

In U.S. History Honors, students trace the nation's history from the precolonial period to the present. They perfect their ability to use logic and evidence to create persuasive written arguments in essays, two independent research projects, and shorter exercises such as document-based questions and analytic discussions.
World History*
In World History, Culture, and Geography, students study the major turning points that shaped the modern world including the Enlightenment, industrialization, imperialism, nationalism, political revolutions, the world wars, the Cold War, decolonization, and globalization. By presenting content from multiple perspectives, and through diverse primary and secondary source materials, this course provides students with a solid foundation in the history of the modern era and prepares students to be active and informed citizens of the world.

In World History Honors, students complete two independent research projects focused on historical periods of their choosing. Students learn to see the world today as a product of a process that began thousands of years ago, when humans became a speaking, travelling, and trading species. Through historical analysis grounded in primary sources, case studies, and research, students investigate the continuity and change of human culture, governments, economic systems, and social structures.
U.S. Government and Politics*
In U.S. Government and Politics, students examine the history, principles, and function of the political system established by the U.S. Constitution. Starting with a basic introduction to the role of government in society and the philosophies at the heart of American democracy, this course provides students with the knowledge needed to become informed and empowered participants in the U.S. political system.

For U.S. Government and Politics Honors students, the course culminates with a multipart independent research project focused on a topic of their choice.
Western Civilization
In Western Civilization, students survey the history of the “West” from the early modern era through the contemporary period. Students learn about and analyze the effects of the Renaissance and the Reformation, the reasons behind European expansion, the importance of Muslim expansion, power exercised by absolute monarchs, the role of the Enlightenment, consequences of the French Revolution, and the rise of nationalism. Students move on to study the Industrial Revolution and trace the effects of European imperialism in the Americas, Africa, and Asia. They examine the roles that nationalism, militarism, and propaganda played in causing the First and Second World Wars. They work to understand the Cold War period, independence movements in nations colonized by Europeans, and explore the many facets of the modern world.
AP U.S. Government and Politics
The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, students in AP U.S. Government and Politics study the operations and structure of the U.S. government as well as the behavior of the electorate and politicians. Students gain the analytic perspective necessary to critically evaluate political data, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes. Along the way, students develop their own theoretical analysis of American politics as they analyze relationships between political, social, and economic institutions.
AP U.S. History
In AP U.S. History, students investigate the development of American economics, politics, and culture from c. 1491 to the present through historical analysis grounded in primary sources, research, and writing. Within each time period, students explore larger themes and topics such as American and national identity; work, exchange, and technology; geography and the environment; migration and settlement; politics and power; America in the world; American and regional culture; and social structures. The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP U.S. History prepares students for further study in history, political science, economics, sociology, and law.
AP World History: Modern
In this course, students examine social, economic, political, and cultural trends from 1200 to the present. Students use comparison, causation, and continuity, in addition to change over time, in order to develop historical arguments and make connections. Throughout the course, students explore six broad themes: humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation.
AP European History
In AP European History, students investigate significant events, developments, and processes from approximately 1450 to the present. Students learn how to use the same skills, practices and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time. Students explore seven broad themes throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: the interaction of Europe and the world, economic and commercial development, cultural and intellectual developments, state and other institutions of power, social organization and development, national and European identity, and technological and scientific innovations.

MATHEMATICS

Math I
In Mathematics I, an integrated math course, students build their command of geometric knowledge, as well as linear and exponential relationships. They learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include relationships between quantities; linear and exponential relationships; reasoning with equations; descriptive statistics; congruence, proof, and constructions; and connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates.
Algebra 1A
Algebra 1A and 1B address the need for an expanded, two-year treatment of traditional high school Algebra I curriculum. Focusing on review of pre-algebra skills and introductory algebra content, Algebra 1A allows students to deepen their understanding of real numbers in their various forms and then extend their knowledge to linear equations in one and two variables. Course topics include integers; the language of algebra; fractions and decimals; exponents; solving equations with four basic operations; solving equations with roots, powers, or multiple steps; functions; and linear equations.
Algebra 1B
Algebra 1B is the second course in a two-year Algebra I sequence. Topics include a review of introductory algebra, measurement, graphing data, linear equations, systems of linear equations, polynomials, factoring of polynomials, factoring of quadratic functions, and rational expressions.

Algebra I
Algebra I builds students' command of linear, quadratic, and exponential relationships. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include problem-solving with basic equations and formulas, an introduction to functions and problem solving, linear equations and systems of linear equations, exponents and exponential functions, sequences and functions, descriptive statistics, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations and functions, and function transformations and inverses.
Geometry
Geometry builds upon students' command of geometric relationships and formulating mathematical arguments. Course topics include reasoning, proof, and the creation of sound mathematical arguments; points, lines, and angles; triangles and trigonometry; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; congruence, similarity, transformations, and constructions; coordinate geometry; three-dimensional solids; and applications of probability. 
Math II
In Mathematics II, the second course in the integrated math series, students extend their geometric knowledge and learn about quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, exploring the relationship between these and their linear and exponential counterparts. Course topics include extending the number system; quadratic functions and modeling; expressions and equations; applications of probability; similarity, right-triangle trigonometry, and proof; and circles with and without coordinates.
Algebra II
Algebra II introduces students to advanced functions, with a focus on developing a strong conceptual grasp of the expressions that define those functions. Course topics include quadratic equations and functions, polynomial functions, rational expressions and functions, radical expressions and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, modeling with functions, probability and inferential statistics, probability distributions, and sampling distributions and confidence intervals.
Math III
In Mathematics III, the third course in the integrated math series, students study advanced functions, trigonometry, and probability and statistics as they synthesize their prior knowledge and solve increasingly challenging problems. Course topics include formulating inferences and conclusions from data; polynomial, rational, and radical relationships; trigonometry of general triangles and trigonometric functions; and mathematical modeling.
Finite Math and Trigonometry
Finite Math and Trigonometry prepares students to be successful in precalculus, statistics, and calculus courses. Students examine topics like trigonometric identities, graphing advanced functions, modeling with linear and nonlinear functions, conic sections, the polar coordinate system, parametric equations, and logarithms. Students learn how to use their problem-solving skills to find solutions to real-world issues.
Precalculus*
In Precalculus, students use their knowledge of algebra, geometry, and functions to prepare them to study calculus. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions; systems of equations; and conic sections. Additionally, students learn how to calculate and use trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and laws of cosine and sine; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers.

In the Precalculus Honors course, students make additional connections to other disciplines and areas of mathematics, including calculus and geometry. They are expected to demonstrate higher-order thinking skills and apply advanced mathematics in real-world contexts.
Statistics and Probability
In Statistics and Probability, students learn key data analysis and probabilistic concepts, calculations, and relevance to real-world applications. They are challenged to work toward mastery of computational skills, apply calculators and other technology in data analysis, deepen their understanding of key ideas and solution strategies, and extend their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications. Course topics include types of data, common methods used to collect data, and representations of data, including histograms, bar graphs, box plots, and scatterplots. Students analyze and employ methods of extending results, involving samples and populations, distributions, summary statistics, experimental design, regression analysis, simulations, and confidence intervals.
Calculus
In Calculus, students primarily focus on the definition and interpretation of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration. They calculate and employ derivative formulas in order to find the derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Students prove and use theorems, sketch graphs, evaluate functions, and use graphical calculators to verify results. They utilize definite integrals in problems involving area, velocity, acceleration, volume of a solid, area of a surface of revolution. Application-level learning, based on Rolle’s Theorem, Mean value Theorem, L’Hôpital’s rule, Newton’s method, higher order derivatives, and Riemann Sum, also comprises the Calculus curriculum.
AP Calculus AB
In AP Calculus AB, an introductory first-semester college-level calculus course, students learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Instead of simply getting the right answer, students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and to apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Topics include limits and continuity; definition and fundamental properties of differentiation; composite, implicit, and inverse functions of differentiation; contextual applications of differentiation; analytical applications of differentiation; integration and accumulation of change; differential equations; and applications of integration.
AP Calculus BC
AP Calculus BC is both an introductory college-level first-semester course as well as the subsequent college-level single-variable course. Topics include limits and continuity; definition and fundamental properties of differentiation; composite, implicit, and inverse functions of differentiation; contextual applications of differentiation; analytical applications of differentiation; integration and accumulation of change; differential equations; applications of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and vector-valued functions; and infinite sequences and series.
Multivariable Calculus
Multivariable Calculus is an intermediate-level college course for advanced students of mathematics. Topics include vectors, linear algebra, (partial) differentiation, vector functions, extrema problems, as well as multiple, line, and surface integrals.
AP Statistics
The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP Statistics gives students hands-on experience collecting, analyzing, graphing, and interpreting real-world data. They will learn to effectively design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating research examples taken from daily life. The next time they hear the results of a poll or study, they will know whether the results are valid.
AP Computer Science A
In AP Computer Science A, the equivalent of an introductory college course, students study the programming language, Java, as well as other coding concepts. They work to solve problems and perform tasks based on their design of computer programs. Students determine algorithms and writing code in order to successfully execute the programs, finding and correcting errors as necessary.

HIGH SCHOOL LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH (LOTE)

French I
In French I, students learn how to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as sports, travel, and medicine. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the verb system, adjective agreement, formal and informal address, reflexive verbs, and past tense. Students also gain an understanding of the cultures of French-speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe, as well as insight into Francophone culture and people.
French II
In French II, students learn how to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives - both in formal and informal address. Vocabulary includes terms in cooking, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes present- and past-tense verb forms and uses, negation, and direct and indirect objects. Students deepen their knowledge of French-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues.
French III
French 3 is an intermediate course that builds upon the skills acquired in French 1 and 2. The class is designed to improve conversational French and focuses on the four key areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Throughout the course, students deepen their knowledge of culture in French-speaking countries and expand their command of grammar. They learn how to express themselves fully in the French language, becoming familiar with the conditional, present perfect, past perfect, subjunctive, and other tenses.
French IV
In French IV, advanced language learners continue to build upon their skills to gain an even greater command of French. Students learn more about French-speaking regions and cultures around the world as they incorporate new vocabulary and grammar concepts into their study. Students learn how to use and recognize various tenses in readings, listening activities, writing, and conversation, such as the past and present perfect, as well as the imperfect. Additional grammar concepts include the comparative, superlative, interrogative adverbs, pronominal verbs, the subjunctive, the conditional, indirect discourse, and present and past participles.
AP French Language and Culture
Equivalent to an intermediate college-level French course, AP French Language and Culture offers students a chance to practice and perfect their speaking, listening, writing, and conversational skills in scenarios students would encounter in real-life. Topics include families in different societies, the influence of language and culture on identity, influences of beauty and art, how science and technology affect our lives, factors that influence the quality of life, and environmental, political, and societal challenges.
Spanish I
In Spanish I, students learn how to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as home life, occupations, travel, and medicine. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the structures and uses of present-tense verb forms, imperatives, adjective agreement, impersonal constructions, formal and informal address, and reflexive verbs. Students explore words used in different Spanish-speaking regions, and learn about the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries and regions within and outside of Europe.
Spanish II
Building on Spanish I concepts, Spanish II students learn to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives - both in formal and informal situations. Students expand their vocabulary in topics such as cooking, ecology, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes a review of present-tense verb forms, an introduction to the past tense, the conditional mood, imperatives, impersonal constructions, and reported speech. Students deepen their knowledge of Spanish-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues.
Spanish III
In Spanish III, students improve their command of Spanish by exploring contemporary and relevant topics such as urbanization and population growth in Latin American countries, global health concerns, jobs of the future, and scientific advancements. Students review the formation and use of regular and irregular verbs in the present and future tenses, as well as the use of reflexive particles and infinitives. They also expand their understanding of verb tenses by learning the subjunctive, noun and adjective agreement, the comparative and superlative degree of adjectives, and the placement and use of direct and indirect objects and pronouns. Students build upon their existent lexicon through exposure to word roots and families, popular slang, the correct use of words that are often confused for one another, and review of concepts such as proper placement of accents and stress.
Spanish IV
In Spanish IV, students develop a strong command of the Spanish language through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. They develop an understanding and appreciation of the geography, history, and culture of various Spanish-speaking regions. Students build upon existing and learn new vocabulary. They read various pieces, including a novel, and analyze what they read in writing, class discussions, projects, and presentations. Embedded within each lesson are grammar components like the past perfect and imperfect subjunctive.
AP Spanish Language and Culture
Equivalent to a college-level literature survey course, typically equivalent to a third- or fourth-semester college course. Students learn about various Spanish-speaking cultures around the globe and use their knowledge of Spanish to interact with, respond to, and analyze real-life materials (print media, books, films, and music). Topics include families in different societies, the influence of language and culture on identity, influences of beauty and art, how science and technology affect our lives, factors that impact the quality of life, and environmental, political, and societal challenges.
AP Spanish Literature and Culture
Equivalent to a college-level literature survey course, AP Spanish Literature and Culture is typically taken during a student's third or fourth semester in college. Students read and analyze short stories, novels, plays, essays, and poetry produced by writers in Spain, Latin America, and the United States. Topics include la época medieval, el siglo XVI, el siglo XVII, la literatura romántica, realista y naturalista, La Generación del 98 y el Modernismo, teatro y poesía del siglo XX, El Boom latinoamericano, and escritores contemporáneos de los Estados Unidos y España.

ENGLISH

English 9
In English 9, students explore exemplary pieces of literature from both fictional and nonfictional genres. They read a variety of short stories, poems, a novella (Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis), and Shakespeare's MacBeth. Students analyze the use of literary elements in relation to character development, plot, and theme. They study literature contextually, working to identify the historical and social settings through which various authors produce/d writings. Students learn how to use textual evidence to establish their own claims, in addition to responding to those of others, through essay writing, discussions, presentations, and other assignments. Students also explore the rhetoric of arguments and speeches to aid in both their understanding of the texts they read and also to create their own unique analyses.
English 10*
In English 10, students continue to develop their reading, listening, and speaking skills. Three writing applications guide the curriculum: persuasive, expository, and narrative writing. Readings include poems, stories, speeches, plays, and a graphic novel, as well as a variety of informational texts. The readings represent a wide variety of purposes and cultural perspectives, ranging from the Indian epic, the Ramayana, to accounts of Hurricane Katrina told through different media. Students gain an enhanced awareness and command of rhetorical techniques and increase their understanding of writing for different audiences.

English 10 Honors provides students with opportunities to engage in outside readings, open-ended journal entries, and free-form projects, all of which challenge Honors students to use their creativity and critical thinking skills to gain independent mastery of reading and writing.
English 11*
In the English 11 course, students examine the belief systems, events, and literature that have shaped the United States. In this course, students analyze a wide range of literature, both fiction and nonfiction. They build writing skills by composing analytical essays, persuasive essays, personal narratives, and research papers. Overall, students gain an understanding of the way American literature represents an array of voices that contribute to our multicultural identity.

Activities and assignments like outside readings, open-ended journal entries, and free-form projects challenge English 11 Honors students to use their creativity and critical thinking skills to gain independent mastery of reading and writing.
English 12*
In English 12, students closely analyze world literature and consider how we humans define and interact with the unknown, the monstrous, and the heroic. In the epic poems The Odyssey, Beowulf, and The Inferno, in Shakespeare’s Tempest, in the satire of Swift, and in the rhetoric of World War II, students examine how the ideas of “heroic” and “monstrous” have been defined across cultures and time periods and how the treatment of the “other” can make monsters or heroes of us all. Reading Frankenstein and works from those who experienced the imperialism of the British Empire, students explore the notion of inner monstrosity and consider how the dominant culture can be seen as monstrous in its ostensibly heroic goal of enlightening the world.

In English 12 Honors, students analyze a wide range of literature, both fiction and nonfiction. They build writing skills by composing analytical essays, persuasive essays, personal narratives, and research papers. In order to develop speaking and listening skills, honors students actively participate in discussions and deliver engaging speeches.
Expository Writing
In Expository Writing, students delve into the power and potential of the English language. Reading and writing assignments explore relevant and universal themes including war, human rights, cultural awareness, and humans' relationships with the environment, the media, and technology. By reading and evaluating seminal speeches, essays, and stories, students learn how writing is used to explain, persuade, and entertain. Students develop and practice expressing their own ideas in four types of essays: compare and contrast, persuasive, evaluative, and explanatory. Additional assignments focus on narrative writing, research projects, and speeches.
AP English Language and Composition
In AP English Language and Composition, students investigate rhetoric and its impact on culture through analysis of notable fiction and nonfiction texts, from pamphlets to speeches to personal essays. By examining all texts through a rhetorical lens, students become skilled readers and analytical thinkers. Focusing specifically on language, purpose, and audience gives students a broad view of the effect of text and its cultural role. They write expository and narrative texts to hone the effectiveness of their own use of language, and they develop varied, informed arguments through research. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition.
AP English Literature and Composition
AP English Literature and Composition immerses students in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students will read and write daily, using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and class discussions to assess and improve their skills and knowledge. The course places special emphasis on reading comprehension, structural and critical analysis of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in creative writing, communications, journalism, literature, and composition.

SCIENCE

The Living Earth
The Living Earth, built to Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), integrates biology with Earth and space science. Throughout the course, students apply fundamental biological concepts to better understand how living systems and Earth's systems are interrelated and interdependent. Course topics include structure and function of living organisms, heredity, genetic variation, natural selection, evolution, the biosphere, types of ecosystems and biomes, the ecology of populations and communities, the effects of change on the biosphere and its parts, the relationship of humans with the environment, and explorations of challenges humans face and sustainable solutions for the future health of Earth and its inhabitants.
Biology*
In Biology, students first gain an understanding of the nature of science and biology, including the major themes of structure and function, matter and energy flow, systems, and the interconnectedness of life. Students then apply those themes to the structure and function of the cell, cellular metabolism, and biogeochemical cycles. Building on this foundation, students explore the connections and interactions between living things by studying genetics, ecosystems and natural selection, and evolution.

In Biology Honors, students use scientific process skills to delve deeper into topics. They are challenged to deconstruct scientific claims, analyze scientific articles, and perform follow-up experiments.
Chemistry in the Earth System
Chemistry in the Earth System, built to Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), integrates chemistry with biology and Earth science. Throughout the course, students apply fundamental chemistry concepts to better understand how matter and energy interact in the natural and designed world, how human activities impact Earth's systems, and how science can be used to develop new technologies and engineering solutions. Course topics include the nature of matter, forces and energy, atomic structure, bonding in matter, chemical reactions, equilibrium and kinetics, thermodynamics, matter and energy in Earth's physical and living systems, energy and resource consumption, and environmental challenges.
Chemistry*
In Chemistry, students examine matter and the changes it undergoes. Topics include the nature of science, the importance of chemistry to society, atomic structure, bonding in matter, chemical reactions, redox reactions, electrochemistry, phases of matter, equilibrium and kinetics, acids and bases, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, nuclear reactions, organic chemistry, and alternative energy. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

In Chemistry Honors, students use fundamental chemistry to gain a critical understanding of both the nature of science, as well as how chemistry is applied in technology and engineering.
Physics of the Universe
Physics of the Universe, built to Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), integrates physics with Earth and space science. Throughout the course, students apply fundamental physics concepts to better understand the impact of human activities on Earth's systems and how forces, energy, and matter interact throughout the universe. Course topics include electricity and magnetism, energy consumption and resources, dynamics, momentum and gravitation, waves, cosmology, and an exploration of Earth's physical systems.
Physics*
In Physics, students develop a solid grounding in scientific methods and scientific inquiry, acquiring factual knowledge of physical phenomena to understand many of the technological challenges in today’s world. The course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice critical scientific skills within the context of relevant scientific questions. Topics include the nature of science, math for physics, energy, kinematics, force and motion, momentum, gravitation, chemistry for physics, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, waves, nuclear physics, quantum physics, and cosmology.

In the Physics Honors course, students use concepts they learn, such as force and motion, in order to explore real-world topics such as the Voyager space probes.
Environmental Science
In Environmental Science, students explore the biological, physical, and sociological principles related to the environment in which organisms live on Earth, the biosphere. Course topics include natural systems on Earth; biogeochemical cycles; the nature of matter and energy; the flow of matter and energy through living systems; populations; communities; ecosystems; ecological pyramids; renewable and non-renewable natural resources; land use; biodiversity; pollution; conservation; sustainability; and human impacts on the environment.
Earth Science
In Earth Science, students explore Earth's composition, structure, processes, and history; its atmosphere, freshwater, and oceans; and its environment in space. Course topics include an exploration of the major cycles that affect every aspect of life, including weather, climate, air movement, tectonics, volcanic eruptions, rocks, minerals, geologic history, Earth's environment, sustainability, and energy resources.
AP Biology
The equivalent of an introductory college-level biology course, AP Biology builds students' understanding of biology on both the micro and macro scales. After studying cell biology, students move on to understand how evolution drives the diversity and unity of life. Students examine how living systems store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information, and how organisms utilize free energy.
AP Chemistry
The equivalent of an introductory college-level chemistry course, AP Chemistry builds students' understanding of the nature and reactivity of matter. After studying chemical reactions and electrochemistry, students move on to understand how the chemical and physical properties of materials can be explained by the structure and arrangements of the molecules and the forces between those molecules. Students examine the laws of thermodynamics, molecular collisions, and the reorganization of matter in order to understand how changes in matter take place. Students also explore chemical equilibria, including acid-base equilibria.
AP Environmental Science
AP Environmental Science, the equivalent of an introductory college-level science course, provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. The course draws upon various disciplines, including geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography in order to explore a variety of environmental topics. Students study natural systems on Earth; biogeochemical cycles; the nature of matter and energy; the flow of matter and energy through living systems; populations; communities; ecosystems; ecological pyramids; renewable and nonrenewable resources; land use; biodiversity; pollution; conservation; sustainability; and human impacts on the environment.
AP Physics 1
AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based introductory physics first-semester college course. Students study a variety of topics, including kinematics, dynamics, circular motion, gravitation, energy, momentum, simple harmonic motion, torque, rotational motion, electric charge, electric force, direct current circuits, and mechanical waves and sounds.
AP Physics 2
AP Physics 2 is an algebra-based introductory physics second-semester college course. Students study a variety of topics, including the pressure and forces of fluids, thermodynamics, electric force, electric circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, geometric optics, and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics.
AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism
AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism is a calculus-based course equivalent to an introductory college semester-long physics course. Topics include electrostatics, conductors, capacitors, dielectrics, electric circuits, magnetic fields, and electromagnetism.
AP Physics C: Mechanics
AP Physics C: Mechanics is a calculus-based course equivalent to an introductory college semester-long physics course. Students explore topics such as kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, the principle of conservation, linear momentum, rotation, oscillations, and gravitation.

HIGH SCHOOL VISUAL AND 
PERFORMING ARTS

Art Appreciation
Art Appreciation is a survey of the history of Western visual arts, with a primary focus on painting. Students begin with an introduction to the basic principles of painting and learn how to critique and compare works of art. They then explore prehistoric and early Greek and Roman art before they move on to the Middle Ages. Emphasis is placed on the Renaissance and the principles and masters that emerged in Italy and northern Europe. Students continue their art tour with the United States during the 20th century, a time of great innovation as abstract art took center stage. While Western art is the course's primary focus, students will finish the course by studying artistic traditions in Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas.
Music Appreciation
Music Appreciation introduces students to histories, theories, and genres of music. In the first semester of the course, students learn about ancient musical forms and classical music. In the second semester, students explore rich modern traditions, including American jazz, gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip-hop. Students also examine the interface of music and social movements and study how the emergent global society and the Internet bring musical forms together in new ways from all around the world.
Introduction to Digital Photography
In Introduction to Digital Photography, students learn about the mechanics of taking photographs, becoming acquainted with the camera’s capabilities, as well as the settings used to produce the desired shots. Throughout the course, students reflect on the artistic and editorial value of the work of other photographers, develop their own expressive creativity by taking and digitally manipulating their images, and learn how to present their work in the digital age.
Music of the 20th Century
In Music of the 20th Century, students examine the historical significance of popular music in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present. While musical training is not required in order to enroll in the course, students will think about how to analyze musical sound as “texts” (historical material). Throughout the course, students focus on a variety of contexts: the cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions of genres ranging from Tin Pan Alley to blues, jazz, rhythm and blues, country, folk, soul, rock, disco, hip-hop, and contemporary pop music. Additionally, students explore popular music as an art form, a business, an activity of identity-making, a phenomenon encompassing both conflict and consensus, and a key area in the life of Americans.

HIGH SCHOOL ELECTIVES

Economics*
In Economics, students are introduced to key economic principles, applying basic mathematics to concepts they study throughout the one-semester course. Topics include the fundamental properties of economics, including an examination of markets from both historical and current perspectives; the basics of supply and demand; the theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; the concept of money and how it evolved; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; Keynesian economics; the productivity, wages, investment, and growth involved in capitalism; unemployment, inflations, and the national debt; and a survey of the global economy.

In Economic Honors, students not only learn how to identify and understand economic concepts and trends, but are required to provide their own in-depth critical analyses, effectively learning how to think like an economist.
Ethnic Studies
Ethnic Studies is a one-semester history and sociology course in which students learn more about race, culture, ethnicity, and identity, reflecting critically on their own experiences as well as those of others. Major topics include identity, immigration, assimilation and distinctiveness, power and oppression, struggles for rights, regionalism, culture and the media, and the formation of new cultures.
Geography and World Cultures
In Geography and World Cultures, students explore how geographic features, human relationships, politics, social structures, economics, science, technology, and the arts have developed and influenced life in countries around the world. Students develop note-taking skills, learn about the major elements of analytic writing, and critically examine primary documents. Students learn how to read maps, charts, and graphs, and how to create them as well.

Computer Applications
In Computer Applications, a Technical and Career Education course, students are introduced to software applications that prepare them to succeed in the workplace and beyond. Students develop an understanding of professional communications and leadership skills while gaining proficiency with word processing, email, and presentation management software. Students will also be able to demonstrate digital literacy through basic study web publishing and design, spreadsheets and database software. They explore careers in the fields of business and information technology while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities that are of interest to them.
Psychology
In Psychology, students are introduced to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatments of psychological disorders, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations as they use the scientific method, evaluate claims, consider evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.

Creative Writing
In Creative Writing, students explore various works of short fiction and poetry, producing a written portfolio at the end of the course that includes one revised short story and three to five polished poems. Students draft, revise, and polish fiction and poetry through writing exercises, developing familiarity with literary terms and facility with the writing process as they study elements of creative writing. In addition to applying literary craft elements in guided creative writing exercises, students engage in critical reading activities designed to emphasize the writing craft of a diverse group of authors. Studying the writing technique of a range of authors provides students with models and inspiration as they develop their own voices and refine their understanding of the literary craft.

Health Education
Health Education is a valuable, skills-based health education course designed for general education in grades 9 through 12. Students develop knowledge, attitudes, and essential skills in a variety of health-related subjects, including mental and emotional health, social health, nutrition, physical fitness, substance use and abuse, disease prevention and treatment, and injury prevention and safety. Students learn how to identify and access valid health information, practice self-management, identify internal and external influences, communicate effectively, make healthy decisions, set goals, and advocate for themselves.
AP Macroeconomics
In AP Macroeconomics, the equivalent of a 100-level college-level class, students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in our economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. Throughout the course, students will also examine how individuals, institutions, and influences affect people, and how those factors can impact everyone's life through employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes, and production.
AP Microeconomics
In AP Microeconomics, the equivalent of a 100-level college-level class, students study the behavior of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. They explore why the same product costs different amounts at different stores, in different cities, at different times. Additionally, students learn to spot patterns in economic behavior and how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behavior under various conditions. Throughout the course, students develop an economic way of thinking while simultaneously working to understand the nature and function of markets, the role of scarcity and competition, the influence of factors such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in promoting a healthy economy.

AP Psychology
In AP Psychology, an introductory college-level overview of current psychological research methods and theories, students explore the therapies used by professional counselors and clinical psychologists. They examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. Students also study core psychological concepts, such as the brain and sense functions, and learn to gauge human reactions, gather information, and form meaningful syntheses.
*includes an honors option

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